Mind, Heart, & Soul.

Trying to stay awake in a boring class

image

(via cha-castro)

Apr 16
Apr 16

heyfunniest:

is this even a kid show

(Source: thespoonmissioner, via djignis)

masqverades:

do you ever get so disgusted with yourself, like you can not believe how stupid and thoughtless you are and it’s so frustrating because you keep telling yourself that you’ll do better next time but then next time rolls around and the same thing keeps happening and you end up in this pattern of mediocrity. 

(Source: clavacles, via emi-bee)

Apr 16

browngirlinterrupted:

don’t check up on people who have decided you are not in their picture anymore. you don’t need to know how they’re doing. save yourself the trouble, seriously.

(via so-i-sailed-away)

Apr 15

"I want to study your curves with my tongue"

-

(Source: virginfreak, via justa-sucker-with-no-self-esteem)

Apr 15

"Strange how we decorate pain."

- Margaret Atwood, from Oh (via atmosthetic)

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via imalittleteap0t)

Apr 15
Apr 15

(Source: jilllionaire, via oliveracedavis)

wnderlst:

Total Lunar Eclipse (April 15, 2014) | Matthew Crowley
Apr 15

wnderlst:

Total Lunar Eclipse (April 15, 2014) | Matthew Crowley

(via emily-anomaly)

stefdelima:

Yep, pretty much.
Apr 15

stefdelima:

Yep, pretty much.

(via alwaysbringabananatotheparty)

beesmygod:

like, i guess this isnt even a particularly “”“adult”“” blog but theres something very unnerving about clicking through to a new follower and seeing “age: 14” on the sidebar. i feel like a chaperon at a highschool dance. leave some room for jesus

(via flirtybutchaste)

Apr 15
Apr 15

(via cha-castro)

Apr 15

"You Kissed All My Eloquence Away"

- (via aquietjoy)

(Source: melissahem, via langleav)

Apr 15

"Sometimes you couldn’t face the sadness of being forgotten until you felt the comfort of being remembered again."

- Ann Brashares, The Last Summer (via senshuk)

(via cruzsherri)

Apr 15
theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."
Apr 15

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via langleav)